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Facebook’s New Ad Structure, Cutts on Paid Links, Getty Images Goes Embeddable and More – Digital Marketing News

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SEO engineer

The last two weeks have been busy with a few big happenings, from Facebook changing its advertising campaign structure to Getty Images going embeddable. Find out what’s been going on in the latest edition of Fresh Egg’s digital marketing news.

Matt Cutts gives the lowdown on paid links

Matt Cutts has released an interesting video that explains Google’s definition of a paid link by clarifying the five main key considerations the search giant uses when judging the intention of a link:

  • Explicit link sales - Was there an exchange of money for a link?
  • Close to the value of money - Was there an exchange to the equivalence of money for a link, for example a $600 gift card?
  • Gift vs loan - Was a product of value exchanged for a link? Cutts makes it clear that loaning of products for review is not considered a gift and is acceptable
  • Intent of audience - Cutts goes on to explain that giving away products for the purpose of acquiring users and fans etc. is acceptable; however, giving away products purely to receive links is seen as unacceptable
  • Surprise or not - Cutts further clarifies this exchange of goods by explaining that context is important. He gives the example of a film blogger; the blogger wouldn’t be surprised to receive free cinema tickets; however, would be very surprised to receive a free car

It is good to see Google clarify these points as there has been a lot of debate about the intricacies of paid links since the release of Penguin back in April 2012.

Cutts also suggests that to get a real understanding of the rules and regulations around link compensation, webmasters should have a read of the Federal Trade Commission’s Online Advertising and Marketing guidelines.

Google start rolling out a facelift to its search results

Google has been seen heavily testing a new design for its search results pages that offers larger text and removes the underlining of links, and replacing the yellow box that separates ads from organic results with an ‘Ad’ symbol next to any paid listings.

Google's new SERP design

Image source: Searchengineland.com (L = old, R = new)

Google's new SERP designImage source: Searchenginewatch.com (L = new, R = old)

The key thing to note here is not the visual layout changes, but that the page title length has been shortened from just under 70 characters down to just over 50. There is still no word from Google on this change but keep your eyes peeled: if it’s going to be permanent then it shouldn’t be too long until Google explain more about this new design.

What's also interesting is that this change appeared to see a mass rollout, before being rolled back to the old version after a wealth of page title mistakes were spotted. Keen-eyed members of the Fresh Egg SEO team spotted the error below in results for an 'Amazon' branded search:

Google SERP screenshot showing faulty Amazon listing for branded search

David Naylor spotted a few too, including Metro.co.uk and Journalism.co.uk, which he talks about over on his blog.

Getty Images release millions of embeddable images

Getty Images, one of the most popular professional image stock sites out there, has just released an embed function to its images, allowing webmasters to easily create richer content without worries of the Getty lawyers getting enraged. For example, below I have embedded a photo of my favourite actor looking feverishly cool at an Al Gore book release in 2003:

This spells the end for prosaic blog posts and is great news for Getty Images’ photographers as they’re likely to start receiving fairly attributed promotion more often. It is important to note that these images shouldn’t be used for commercial purposes and I would highly recommend that any webmaster interested in using this new functionality read the reasonably short Getty Images Terms of Use to stay out of harm’s way.

Facebook’s new ad campaign structure

Facebook is rolling out a new campaign structure this week that consists of three levels: campaigns, ad sets and ads.

  • Campaigns - These correspond to each of your overall advertising objectives
  • Ad sets - Each campaign can feature multiple ad sets. Each ad set can have its own audience and its own budget
  • Ads - Within each ad set, you can have multiple ads. Each ad can feature a different image, link, video or text

Facebook's new Campaign Structure

Image source: Facebook.com

This will make it easier to optimise different ads for different audiences and to control how much advertisers spend on each audience.

This update began rolling out on Tuesday 4 March and any existing campaigns will automatically be migrated into this new structure. If you have any concerns about using this new campaign structure, see the Facebook announcement for more details, or alternatively give the Fresh Egg social team a call on 0845 373 1071.

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